Important Dates

 

Paper Submission: November 27, 2017   December 11, 2017

Notification of Acceptance: February 5, 2018

Camera Ready Paper: February 26, 2018

Conference Dates: June 25-28, 2018

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Professor Behrouz Far, PhD., P.Eng.

Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering,
University of Calgary
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Title:
Technologies and Prospects of Autonomous and Connected Vehicles

Abstract:
In this presentation, we will talk about issues of the autonomous and connected vehicles and prospects of the intelligent transportation system. We will present the key enabling technologies for practical implementation of the autonomous ground vehicles (AGV) vehicles. Currently, there are more than 50 corporations working on AGVs, from automobile manufacturers to tech leading companies and everything in between. They are working on technologies related to guidance, navigation and control (GNC) and enabling services and computation infrastructure. Several manufacturers expect to have automated AGVs by 2020-25. The key technologies for AGVs are: sensor technology; navigation technology; artificial intelligence algorithms for localization, control, guidance and object identification; data technology for navigation and location based recommendation systems; software/service technologies and computing infrastructure. The infrastructure should have the ability to handle large amounts of data and keep scaling to keep up with growth; performance; high availability; data security; demand-based deployment; resiliency; management and monitoring. We will present an actual implementation of an AGV using instances of the hardware and GNC technologies. Furthermore, we will demo an in-vehicle monitoring system (IVMS) and a software system for vehicle's commute time prediction.



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Dr. Wahab Hamou-Lhadj, PhD.

Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering,
Concordia University
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Title:
On the Path towards Intelligent Logging Systems

Abstract:
Companies across industries use logs to gain important insights into their operations. Logs are valuable business assets because they contain a detailed record of the behavior of users, applications, servers, networks, sensors, IoT devices, etc. The analysis of logs can help diagnose problems, detect security threats and frauds, monitor the health of local and remote devices, and demonstrate compliance with applicable regulations and laws. Despite the importance of logs, it is surprising to see that the practice of logging remains largely ad hoc and arbitrarily. There are no recognized standards, guidelines, or best practices. Current log analysis tools are challenged by the sheer volume, variability, and quality of log data. In this talk, I will provide an overview of the state of the art research in system logging and monitoring and discuss our current work on the design of intelligent logging and monitoring capabilities based on Big Data and artificial intelligence concepts. I will also introduce the concept of Design for Monitorability, which aims to bring logging to early stages of the software development lifecycle.



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Dr. Guy Lapalme, PhD.

Departament of Computer Science
University of Montreal
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Title:
Question-Answering Systems: challenges and perpectives

Abstract:
Following the recent surge of interest in Artificial Intelligence, many systems are being developed to automatically answer requests from users in the form of chatbots or similar systems on a variety of devices. We will describe previous work in Question Answering in the last 20 years in order to put more recent approaches in perspective. We will show the main challenges in building such systems and the need for more data.